Herbert West, Re-animator—A 1922 Novella of Horror by H. P. Lovecraft in Six Parts…

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Herbert West, Re-animator

H. P. Lovecraft, 1922


Part 1: From the Dark

Of Herbert West, who was my friend in college and in after life, I can speak only with extreme terror. This terror is not due altogether to the sinister manner of his recent disappearance, but was engendered by the whole nature of his life-work, and first gained its acute form more than seventeen years ago, when we were in the third year of our course at the Miskatonic University Medical School in Arkham. While he was with me, the wonder and diabolism of his experiments fascinated me utterly, and I was his closest companion. Now that he is gone and the spell is broken, the actual fear is greater. Memories and possibilities are ever more hideous than realities.

The first horrible incident of our acquaintance was the greatest shock I ever experienced, and it is only with reluctance that I repeat it. As I have said, it happened when we were in the medical school where West had already made himself notorious through his wild theories on the nature of death and the possibility of overcoming it artificially. His views, which were widely ridiculed by the faculty and by his fellow-students, hinged on the essentially mechanistic nature of life; and concerned means for operating the organic machinery of mankind by calculated chemical action after the failure of natural processes. In his experiments with various animating solutions, he had killed and treated immense numbers of rabbits, guinea-pigs, cats, dogs, and monkeys, till he had become the prime nuisance of the college. Several times he had actually obtained signs of life in animals supposedly dead; in many cases violent signs but he soon saw that the perfection of his process, if indeed possible, would necessarily involve a lifetime of research. It likewise became clear that, since the same solution never worked alike on different organic species, he would require human subjects for further and more specialised progress. It was here that he first came into conflict with the college authorities, and was debarred from future experiments by no less a dignitary than the dean of the medical school himself — the learned and benevolent Dr. Allan Halsey, whose work in behalf of the stricken is recalled by every old resident of Arkham.

I had always been exceptionally tolerant of West’s pursuits, and we frequently discussed his theories, whose ramifications and corollaries were almost infinite. Holding with Haeckel that all life is a chemical and physical process, and that the so-called “soul” is a myth, my friend believed that artificial reanimation of the dead can depend only on the condition of the tissues; and that unless actual decomposition has set in, a corpse fully equipped with organs may with suitable measures be set going again in the peculiar fashion known as life. That the psychic or intellectual life might be impaired by the slight deterioration of sensitive brain-cells which even a short period of death would be apt to cause, West fully realised. It had at first been his hope to find a reagent which would restore vitality before the actual advent of death, and only repeated failures on animals had shewn him that the natural and artificial life-motions were incompatible. He then sought extreme freshness in his specimens, injecting his solutions into the blood immediately after the extinction of life. It was this circumstance which made the professors so carelessly sceptical, for they felt that true death had not occurred in any case. They did not stop to view the matter closely and reasoningly.

It was not long after the faculty had interdicted his work that West confided to me his resolution to get fresh human bodies in some manner, and continue in secret the experiments he could no longer perform openly. To hear him discussing ways and means was rather ghastly, for at the college we had never procured anatomical specimens ourselves. Whenever the morgue proved inadequate, two local negroes attended to this matter, and they were seldom questioned. West was then a small, slender, spectacled youth with delicate features, yellow hair, pale blue eyes, and a soft voice, and it was uncanny to hear him dwelling on the relative merits of Christchurch Cemetery and the potter’s field. We finally decided on the potter’s field, because practically every body in Christchurch was embalmed; a thing of course ruinous to West’s researches.

I was by this time his active and enthralled assistant, and helped him make all his decisions, not only concerning the source of bodies but concerning a suitable place for our loathsome work. It was I who thought of the deserted Chapman farmhouse beyond Meadow Hill, where we fitted up on the ground floor an operating room and a laboratory, each with dark curtains to conceal our midnight doings. The place was far from any road, and in sight of no other house, yet precautions were none the less necessary; since rumours of strange lights, started by chance nocturnal roamers, would soon bring disaster on our enterprise. It was agreed to call the whole thing a chemical laboratory if discovery should occur. Gradually we equipped our sinister haunt of science with materials either purchased in Boston or quietly borrowed from the college — materials carefully made unrecognisable save to expert eyes — and provided spades and picks for the many burials we should have to make in the cellar. At the college we used an incinerator, but the apparatus was too costly for our unauthorised laboratory. Bodies were always a nuisance — even the small guinea-pig bodies from the slight clandestine experiments in West’s room at the boarding-house.

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What’s on the Tube? A 2015 Canadian Creeper: “Man VS”. The question is: VS what? I’m not so sure you wanna know…💀💀💀

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This poster was “the lure”.

“It came from another world. It did not come in peace.”

Do they ever? I wasn’t so sure about this little Netflix beauty. My “Horror nose” was sniffing around the Horror category, and I adore found footage films. It’s an obsession. I just love them all. I really dug the poster above. And the trailer was very promising. But, it wasn’t until I snooped around some Canadian websites and saw the other poster (below) that I began salivating. Maybe even drooling. . .

The very promising trailer…

‘Man Vs. is a 2015 Canadian science fiction found footage horror film directed by Adam Massey (The Intruders) from a screenplay by Thomas Michael, based on Massey’s storyline. It stars Chris Diamantopoulos, Chloe Bradt and Michael Cram.

As host of his own hit TV series, Man Vs., Doug Woods is forced to fend for himself for five days in remote locations with no crew, food, or water, only the cameras he carries on his back to film his experiences.

Doug is in the remote woods for a routine episode, until he’s awoken by an earth-shaking crash. Things get weirder as it becomes clear he is not alone. Someone or something is watching him.’ 

Reviews:

“The twist of who is following Doug around is spoiled very early on, and it’s a revelation that you’ll either love or hate. If you can deal with it, the payoff is fantastic and the film ends on the perfect note. Even if you’re unwilling to accept the reality that Doug is trapped in, the film still does a wonderful job of building tension…” – William Brownridge, Toronto Film Scene

“The choice to use low grade CGI is pretty baffling as what they are used for […] could have easily been achieved practically and they’d have looked a hundred times better as a result. Chris Diamantopoulos is great as Doug, perfectly conveying his fear and confusion as everything goes to hell around him…” – Daniel Hadley, Addicted to Horror

” …this is a very well made, entertaining sci-fi/horror. The acting is solid and the cinematography is smart, but they are let down by the unoriginal aspects of the story and … CGI. But to make a film that looks this good on such a low budget is a credit to the director.” – Chris Pickering, UK Horror Scene

Source: https://horrorpedia.com/2017/02/15/man-vs-2015-canadian-sci-fi-found-footage-horror-film-movie-plot-reviews/

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That OTHER poster. 😬 Sadly, this scene must’ve been edited out of the final film. But it’s still a cool movie. Worth a watch!

Reblog: Low in cost, high in bone-chilling terror! 11 Seriously Scary Found Footage Horror Movies

EB8DB2B7-32B9-4D92-B06C-3A05763600DBI love these horror lists! This one is a reblog from The Lineup, at…

https://the-line-up.com/found-footage…

Found footage is the perfect way for filmmakers to terrorize audiences without terrorizing their own wallets. These films combine raw performances with tense, first-person filmmaking to deliver their chills, all shot on a shoestring budget. Many surprised viewers with their fear-factor despite the slim resources available.

Part of why these films are successful? Viewers already know the ending. Those in the found footage are either dead or missing. The real interest is in discovering just how that happened. The technique has spanned genres too, reaching into the realms of fantasy and science fiction.

So dim the lights, pop a Dramamine, and settle in for a night of bone-chilling terror. Here are 11 of the best found footage flicks that horror has to offer. (Click images to enlarge.)

1. The Blair Witch Project

Is there any other way to kick off this list? Eduardo Sánchez and Daniel Myrick delivered one of the scariest films of the 90s with TBWP and quickly became the flag-bearer for the found footage subgenre. It trails three film students as they venture into the woods hunting the legendary Blair Witch. The original script, completed in 1993, left actors the ability to improvise much of the film. It premiered at the Sundance Film Festival and was an immediate hit. What’s more, the director’s $11,000 project terrorized enough people to churn out $248.6 million at the box office, making it one of the most successful independent films of the time. The mysterious and long-awaited Blair Witch reboot hit theaters in 2016.

2. Cannibal Holocaust

Even though the previous entry is credited with launching the found footage phenomenon, it’s Ruggero Deodato’s brutal Cannibal Holocaust that actually gave birth to the subgenre. Released in 1980, the film follows a professor as he searches for his film crew protégés who’ve gone missing. He doesn’t find them–alive–but what he does find is their footage, with scenes of human brutality you’ll wish had never been caught on tape. The film was inspired by Italian media reporting of Red Brigade terrorism and gained its fame thanks to its controversial use of incredibly graphic imagery and violence. In fact, after its premiere in Italy, the film was confiscated by a local magistrate, and Deodato was arrested for obscenity.

3. Lovely Molly

We bet you can’t make it through the night without shuddering after watching this chiller, which follows an unstable newlywed and her four-legged demon suitor.

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What’s on the tube? The Void Works on So Many Levels. It Really Creeped Me Out… ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ …and let’s clear up some things about “cosmicism” & Lovecraftian “homages”…

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Cop: “What, so you worship the Devil, then?”
Man covered in blood, laughing: “I don’t believe in the Devil. But I believe in this.”

-from The Void

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These creepy, crazy-as-shit cult members terrorize a small town hospital in The Void. If you see the black triangle…it’s too late. (IMDb)

The Void is a 2016 Canadian horror film written and directed by Steven Kostanski and Jeremy Gillespie, and produced by Jonathan Bronfman and Casey Walker. It stars Aaron Poole as deputy Daniel Carter, Kenneth Welsh as Dr. Powell, Daniel Fathers as Vincent, Kathleen Munroe as Allison, and Ellen Wong as Kim. The plot follows a group of people who have been trapped in a hospital by a gathering of hooded cultists. The group soon discovers that the hospital has been inhabited by grotesque creatures. [More here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Void_(2016_film)]

I don’t know about you, but THIS is the stuff of which my nightmares are made. But, let’s clarify one thing up front that the “UK Teaser Trailer” below gets wrong:

A Note on Homages

THE VOID IS NOT an homage to John Carpenter. First of all, Carpenter’s 1982 film, The Thing, is based on John W. Campbell’s 1938 novelette Who Goes There?* All three of the “Thing” films, in fact (1951, 1982, 2011**) owe a debt to Campbell’s story.

Carpenter’s film is an homage to Howard Phillips Lovecraft.*** I can’t say for sure whether Campbell had Lovecraft in mind when he wrote Who Goes There?—but it’s possible, since the story was published a year after Lovecraft’s death.

Above, left to right: Alternative film poster for John Carpenter’s The Thing (Pinterest); illustration by “ArtistMEF” for Lovecraft’s story “The Colour Out of Space” (deviantart.com); a poster concept based on Lovecraft’s story “The Colour Out of Space” (Pinterest)
*https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Who_Goes_There%3F

**The novelette inspired the 1951 film The Thing from Another World, which historically, is pretty nifty, but it’s not Carpenter’s 1982 masterpiece:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thing_from_Another_World
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thing_(1982_film)
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thing_(2011_film)
***https://nerdist.com/john-carpenters-the-thing-lovecraftian-35-anniversary/

THE VOID IS an homage to H. P. Lovecraft.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmicism

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lovecraftian_horror


Let’s Talk About Cosmicism…

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Books! Cover Porn

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Derry, Maine—The Nightmare Town of Stephen King’s “IT”…in Perfect Miniature!

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Welcome to Derry, Maine! Home of Pennywise the Clown, and Stephen King’s novel, IT. This amazingly intricate diorama of a section of the fictional town was created by artist Kassiopeya Sachenwerkler.

Thank you to thechive.com, for sharing this absolutely epic diorama of Derry, Maine, USA—the haunted fictional town created by Stephen King, in which he set his novel IT, as well as parts of other stories (Dreamcatcher, Insomnia, Bag of Bones, 11/22/63–See: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derry_(Stephen_King)

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The diorama was created within the body of a 1950s radio. The town up top, the sewer—Pennywise’s lair—down below.

The amazing piece of miniature art was created by Austrian literary artist, Kassiopeya Sachenwerkler. Fascinated by Stephen King’s IT, Sachenwerkler spent over 900 hours recreating the nostalgia and feeling of a 1950’s Derry, with clues and different pieces from the novel. Down below the streets of the town, she even recreated the sewer lair of “Pennywise” the clown that haunts the novel, the town, and its children.

All of this detail, captured in a 1958 radio cabinet! When it’s closed, it looks like a serene scene from the past. It’s only when you open the doors, that you find yourself caught in the “deadlights”.

Check out the detail on this thing in the photos below; and visit the artist: Website, Instagram & Facebook

This is some seriously stellar work!

(Photos: thechive.com)

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